Lephalale

Lephalale

Situated on the Mokolo River (a tributary of the Limpopo) about 60 km from the Botswana border and the Stockpoort border post, this tranquil but prosperous Waterberg town is home to close on 20,000 people, offering excellent game-viewing opportunities and sports tourism, among other activities. The town was started on the farm known as Waterkloof in 1960 and was named after the original owners of the farm. Lephalale is a hunting mecca and prime eco-tourism area drawing thousands of tourists each year. The mild winter months and moderate summer evenings make this a popular venue for camping and stargazing.

The natural beauty of the Waterberg, together with the spectacular sunsets and abundance of game, compose an ideal holiday destination. The absence of malaria is an added bonus for tourists. Lephalale forms part of the world-renowned Waterberg Savannah Biosphere. Today Lephalale is well known for its coal-mining industry, which besides tourism, is the economic mainstay of the town. The Kumba Grootgeluk open-cast mine is the largest mine of its kind in South Africa and provides ISCOR in Tshwane with high-grade coal for iron and steel production. The Matimba Power Station - the largest dry-cooled power station in the world - also put Lephalale on the map. Sightseeing trips to the station can be arranged.