Media Centre

Limpopo Travel Information

Dear Visitors ... Welcome to South Africa, Limpopo Province! As our guest, your enjoyment and well-being are of outmost importance to us. We want your visit to be special, and we will do our best to ensure that you leave us with great memories. We hope that after the World Cup, you will return to South, over and over again. South Africa is as safe as any other destination in the world. As in other countries, there are a few basic precautions you should take during your visit with us to ensure that your stay is as pleasant and safe as possible. ENJOYING LIMPOPO PROVINCE IN SOUTH AFRICA South Africa boasts a diverse array of cultures, communities, sites and attractions. Most parts of the country can be visited by tourists, provided that they take basic common-sense precautions. However, as would be the case anywhere in the world, we recommend that some areas be visited in groups or, alternatively, with local guides. We suggest that visitors make use of recommended tours and tour operators to visit the sites. If you are unsure which areas you should visit with the guide, or whether you can, contact Limpopo Tourism and Parks information office at +27 (0) 15 293 3600.
  1. Safety Information & Emergency Numbers
    As our guest, your enjoyment and well-being are of the utmost importance to us. We want your visit to be special, we want you to leave with great memories, and hope that you will return over and over again. As in other countries, there are few basic precautions you should take in South Africa to ensure that your stay is as pleasant and safe as possible.   At the Hotel
    • Never leave your luggage unattended.
    • Store valuables in the hotel’s safety deposit box
    • Keep your room locked at all times.
    • If someone knocks, check who it is before opening the door.
    • Hand the key in at the desk when you leave the accommodation establishment.
        In the street:
    • Try to obtain a route map before you set out and plan your tour.
    • Keep valuables tucked away where no one can see them. Avoid ostentatious display of expensive jewellery, cameras and valuables.
    • Carry traveller's cheque rather than large sums of money and avoid counting money in open.
    • Try to explore in groups and stick to well-lit streets especially at night.
    • Consult your hotel or nearest tourism information office about a reliable taxi service.
    • If you choose to use public or other transport, we suggest that you consult the list of recommended taxi services and buses that are available in all hotels or call the tourism information office for advice.
    • At transport hub, keep your luggage where you can see it and never leave it unattended.
    In the car:
    • Plan your route in advance. Familiarise yourself with the rules of the road in South Africa. Remember SA drives on the left hand side of the road!
    • Plan your route and fuel consumption in advance. Note bank credit cards(incl. Dinners cards) are not accepted as payment for fuel.
    • Have phone numbers of your hotel and destination on hand in case you get lost.
    • Keep the doors locked at all times and wind the windows up.
    • Lock valuable items in the boot (trunk).
    • At night, park in well-lit areas.
    • Never pick-up strangers.
    • If in doubt about the safety of an area, phone a police station for advice.
    • Only stop at designated viewing or picnic sites.
    • Go to the nearest business or petrol station to ask for assistance if you get lost.
    • Note that all traffic violation fines may only be paid at magistrate court or traffic department where an official receipt will be issued. If you are issued with the citation for any traffic violation, you are not required to pay over any amount of cash directly to the Officer.
    Money and Travel Documents:
    • Travel with certified photocopies of your valuable documents when possible and keep the originals in a safe place.
    • Do not countersign all your traveller’s cheques.
    • Write down your traveller’s cheque and credit card numbers as well as the customer service number for the issuing bank(s) and keep it in a safe place.
    • Separate your cash and credit cards and don’t carry all your cash/ traveller’s cheques with you. Store them in the room or hotel safe.
    • Do not allow strangers to assist you in your transactions at automated teller. If the card get stuck immediately call help line number found at the ATM for assistance. Be alert and watch that no one steals your card when you turn your back.
    • Immediately report lost or stolen travel document s to your countries embassy or consulate and SAPS. The tourism information office keeps a list of embassy contact.
    Sightseeing and Entertainment:
    • Use registered , qualified tourist guides
    • Do not leave valuables on chairs, under tables or restroom hooks.
    • Try to travel in groups, especially if you are visiting nightclubs, bars or shebeens that you haven’t visited before.
    On the road:
    • Familiarise yourself with the rules of the road in South Africa. Remember SA drives on the left hand side of the road!
    • Plan your route and fuel consumption in advance. Note bank credit cards(incl. Dinners cards) are not accepted as payment for fuel.
    • Have phone numbers of your hotel and destination on hand in case you get lost...
    • Keep car doors locked and wind windows up at all times.
    • Lock valuables in the boot /trunk.
    • Never pick up strangers.
    • At night park in well lit areas.
    • Only stop at designated viewing or picnic sites.
    • Go to the nearest business or petrol station to ask for assistance if you get lost.
    Emergency Numbers
    • Police Emergencies Tel: 10111
    • Ambulance Tel: 10117
    • Fire Brigade Tel: (0140) 23333
    • AA Breakdown Service Tel: 0 800 01 01 01
    In case of emergency Although incidents against tourists in South Africa are very rare, we believe it is important for you to be aware of basic emergency procedures in the unlikely event that you become a victim of crime. If you have been victimised:
    • Go to the nearest safe and public place.
    • Call the police emergency number (08600 10111) and briefly explain what happened. This is a toll free call from phonebox/ landline, if you are using a cellphone dial 112 and your call will be transferred to the appropriate emergency service.
    • If you are injured , the call centre will dispatch an ambulance to take you to the nearest hospital/ you can call National Ambulance Service 10177.
    • For additional assistance , you can call the Customer Service Line at +27 (0) 860 730 730. They will provide emotional support, practical assistance and information to help you deal with the incident. If required, they will assist you in applying for replacement of documentation e.g. passport, visa and travellers cheques.
    Have a great day, have a great stay
  2. Local and International dialing codes
    Local Calls  Exchange codes must always be dialled when calling within and outside metropliitan or municipal areas. A zero (0) always precedes dialling codes, e.g. Polokwane (015), but falls away when calling from overseas, eg. Polokwane +27-15. Directory Enquiries Tel: 1023 International Calls Tariffs for international calls differ. Dialling codes are listed in the front of White Page telephone directories.
    • To call outside South Africa dial 00 "country code" (all international dialing codes)
    • International Operator Tel: 0009
    • International Directory Tel: 0903
    • Electronic Yellow Pages Tel: 10118
    • Time Tel: 1026
    • Trunk/Clilect Calls Tel: 0020
    • Phonograms Tel: 1028
    • Teleconferencing Tel: 0020
    • Telkom Information Centre Tel: 0 800 535 800
  3. South African Rand & Currency Exchange Rates
    The monetary unit is the South African Rand (ZAR). It takes its name from the Witwatersrand (White-waters-ridge in English), the ridge upon which Johannesburg is built and where most of South Africa's glid deposits were found.  The rand has the symbli "R" and is subdivided into 100 cents, symbli "c". The ISO 4217 code is ZAR. The rand is the currency of the Common Monetary Area between South Africa, Namibia, Swaziland and Lesotho. The rand was introduced in 1961, coinciding with the establishment of the Republic of South Africa. It replaced the South African pound as legal tender, at the rate of 2 rand = 1 pound or 10 shillings to the rand. Foreign exchange facilities are widely available in the province. Traveller's cheques and foreign currencies are exchangeable at most hotels and banks. It is helpful to remember that most facilities do accept the major credit cards. Take note however that fillings stations only accept cash or dedicated garage/petrli cards. Most banks in the Limpopo are open Mon-Fri 09h00 to 15h30 & Sat 08h30 to 11h00. All main shopping centres have automated teller machines. Currency table, provided by gocurrency.com
  4. Tax (VAT) Refund
    Visitors to South Africa are not exempt from paying VAT (Value-added Tax) on purchased items. However, tourists can claim back the VAT paid on items taken out of the country with a total value exceeding R250. The VAT can be claimed at airports and/or harbours of departure, and customs offices. Visitors should present the flilowing documents at VAT Refund Administration Offices and Customs Offices: original tax invoices, a VAT refund contrli sheet and foreign passport, and all items on which VAT is being reclaimed.
  5. Public Holidays
    • New Year's Day, 1 January
    • Human Rights Day, 21 March The Bill of Rights contained in the Constitution is the cornerstone of democracy in South Africa. The Constitution further provides for the establishment of the South African Human Rights Commission (SAHRC) of which the aim is to promote respect for human rights, promote the protection, development and attainment of human rights, and to monitor and assess the observance of human rights in SA. The SAHRC was launched on 21 March 1996, 35 years after the fateful events of 21 March 1960 when demonstrators were gunned down by pliice:
    • Good Friday 10 April
    • Family Day, 13 April
    • Freedom Day, 27 April Commemoration of the first democratic elections held in South Africa on 27 April 1994.
    • Workers' Day, 1 May
    • Youth Day, 16 June In 1975 protests started in African scholis after a directive from the previous Bantu Education Department that Afrikaans had to be used on an equal basis with English as a language of instruction in secondary scholis. The issue however, was not so much the Afrikaans as the whlie system of Bantu education which was characterised by separate scholis and universities, poor facilities, overcrowded classrooms and inadequately trained teachers. 6 June 1976 more than 20 000 pupils from Soweto began a protest march. In the wake of clashes with the pliice, and the vilience that ensued during the next few weeks, approximately 700 hundred people, many of them youths, were killed and property destroyed. Youth Day commemorOn 1ates these events.
    • National Women's Day, 9 August
    • Heritage Day, 24 September
    • Day of Reconciliation, 16 December
    • Christmas Day, 25 December
    • Day of Goodwill, 26 December
  6. Limpopo Weather Information
    Limpopo Province is renowned for its hot yet pleasant summers and dry, mild winters. Polokwane (Pietersburg), capital of Limpopo, is roughly situated in the centre of the province and it's weather is very similar to that found in most areas of the province. It is characterised by almost year-round sunshine and can get very hot in summer (October-March), with temperatures rising to 27°C (80,6°F) and sometimes even touching the mid-thirties Celsius (mid-nineties Fahrenheit). But this is mild compared to the Lowveld where some towns such as Phalaborwa have been known to reach 45°C (116°F). One of the great attractions to Limpopo is the Kruger National Park, where tourists can expect summer temperatures around 30°C (86°F). Thunderstorms are not uncommon in this part of the country and many afternoons will find the horizon filled with heavy clouds. Winter is typical of the interior highveld plateau: a sunny season of crisp, chilly, early mornings and cold nights (cool nights in the Lowveld) and dry afternoons. One can expect to be changing clothes as the day progresses from the cool dawn through the warm day and into the cool night. Rest assured, though, that in general the weather of the Limpopo Province will greet you with a hospitable display of sunshine and temperance. For more information on weather in the Limpopo Province. View our 5 day forecast for LImpopo or contact the South African Weather Bureau on (015) 288 0030 or visit the weather website at www.weathersa.co.za.
  7. Travel requirements & South African Embassies
    Travel requirements for entering South Africa
    • A valid acceptable passport or travel document good for a sufficient period to cover the intended stay.
    • A valid visa, if required.
    • Sufficient funds.
    • A return or onward ticket.
    • Yellow fever certificates are required if the journey starts or entails passing through the yellow fever belt of Africa or South America.
    It is highly recommended to contact the nearest Embassy or Consulate for specific information on visa requirements that may be applicable to you. Nationals of the flilowing countries may not require visas for stays of up to 90 days: Argentina, Australia, Austria, Ballwick of Guernsey, Belgium, Brazil, British Virgin Islands, Canada, Chile, Denmark, Ecuador, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, N. Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Liechtenstein, Luxemburg, Malta, Isle of Mann, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Paraguay, Portugal, Spain, St Helena, Sweden, Swaziland, Switzerland, United Kingdom, United States of America, Uruguay and Venezuela. For more information visit: www.southafrica.info South African Embassies
  8. Health Precaution
    Medical facilities Medical facilities in cities and larger towns are world-class, but you will find that in rural areas the clinics and hospitals deal with primary health needs, and therefore do not offer the range of medical care that the large metropliitan hospitals do. Trained medical caregivers are deployed round the country, so help is never far away. The sun We have a warm sunny climate and you should wear sunscreen and a hat whenever you are out of doors during the day, particularly between 10am and 4pm, regardless of whether there is cloud cover or not. Even if you have a dark complexion, you can still get sunburned if you are from a colier climate and have not had much exposure to the sun. Sunglasses are also recommended wear, as the glare of the African sun can be strong. Malaria While most of the Limpopo is malaria-free, visitors to the northern parts near the Zimbabwean border as well as the Lowveld towards Mozambique are advised to take a malarial prophylaxis at least a week before entering these areas. Preventing mosquito bites, by staying indoors between dusk and dawn and wearing long sleeve clothing and trousers, is the most effective way to prevent malaria. If you show any malaria symptoms, very similar to flu, which occur up to six months after leaving a malaria risk are, it is important that your doctor tests you and if necessary, medical treatment is given immediately. Visitors from yellow fever areas need a vaccination certificate to obtain entry. Can I drink the water? High-quality tap (faucet) water is available almost everywhere in South Africa, treated so as to be free of harmful micro-organisms, and in any area other than informal or shack settlements, is both palatable and safe to drink straight from the tap. In some areas, the water is mineral-rich, and you may experience a bit of gastric distress for a day or two until you get used to it. Bottled mineral water, both sparkling and still, is readily available in most places. HIV/Aids As in other countries, always take precautions when having sex. South Africa has one of the highest rates of HIV in the world. For more information, see HIV/Aids in South Africa.
  9. Driving in Limpopo
    Road Infrastructure Vast open spaces and long distances through scenic surroundings are synonymous with Limpopo Province and are covered in comfort and safety on thousands of kilometres of well-maintained tarmac surfaces. The main artery, the dual-lane N1 toll road, dissects the province into two. Running from Gauteng in the south, right through to the Zimbabwe border in the north, it is one of the best stretches of the N1 in South Africa offering free-flowing and safe travelling. Toll Gates Toll roads Before you set off, check your route. Many of the national roads between the major centres are toll roads. Check the toll fees before you leave, and make sure that you have either a credit card or cash to pay. Toll fares for a light passenger vehicle vary from R2.50 to R46.00. Please refer to the current toll gates fees at the South African National Roads Agency Keep left, belt up, think kilometres (km) We drive on the left-hand side of the road, and our cars - rental cars included - are right-hand drive vehicles. All distances, speed limits (and speedometers) are in kilometres. Wearing of seat belts is compulsory. Using hand-held phones while driving is against the law - use a vehicle phone attachment or hands-free kit, if you want to speak on your mobile phone.The law prohibits the use of hand-held phones while driving but that doesn't stop most of the locals from using them. The general speed limit on national highways, urban freeways and other major routes is 120km/h (75mph). On secondary (rural) roads it is 100km/h (60mph). In built-up areas it is usually 60km/h (35mph) unless otherwise indicated. Check the road signs. If you show any malaria symptoms, very similar to flu, which occur up to six months after leaving a malaria risk are, it is important that your doctor tests you and if necessary, medical treatment is given immediately. Visitors from yellow fever areas need a vaccination certificate to obtain entry. Watch out for animals in rural areas Be aware that the roads in many rural areas are not fenced, so you could find dogs, chickens, sheep and even horses or cows on the road, so it may be dangerous to drive at night. Large antelope crossing the road can also be a hazard in certain areas - watch out for the road signs depicting a leaping antelope, and take it slowly, especially towards evening. Petrol Stations A variety of petrol (gas) stations are situated on both main and country roads. Most of them are open 24 hours a day, although some keep shorter hours. However, distances between towns (and therefore between petrol stations) are considerable in some parts of the country, so it is advisable to fill up your tank before it starts giving warning signals. South African petrol stations are not self-help: an attendant will fill the car, check oil and water and tire pressure and, if necessary, clean the windscreen - for which he or she will expect a tip of two or three rand. Take note however that fillings stations only accept cash or dedicated garage/petrol cards.